Geopolitics, Resources and Territory (2022)

This Geopolitics, Resources and Territory MA is a unique multidisciplinary programme that has a dual focus on the territorial and resource-related aspects of inter-state relations, bringing together the legal side of things in as much detail as the social sciences. It delivers research-led teaching on critical and fundamental questions relating to international boundaries, sovereignty disputes and environmental geopolitics. This is supplemented with teaching and guidance from leading external practitioners in the field of international dispute resolution and environmental managementYou’ll study a topic that has been taught at King’s for 24 years. This MA programme draws on the wealth of experience of its successful predecessor, the Geopolitics, Territory and Security MA, which has produced alumni in the fields of international civil service and diplomacy, international law, academia, NGOs and specialised political and security risk agencies.You’ll be taught by leading academic specialists with extensive policy networks and experience and practising international lawyers to gain an understanding that goes above and beyond traditional international relations perspectives. You won’t just learn about geopolitics - you’ll study the causes of international strife, the consequences of it, and the solutions. You’ll learn how to apply critical scrutiny of resource and territorial disputes involving - as you might expect in a geography department - a clear focus on their spatial manifestations. You’ll also be exposed to cutting edge debates on border disputes, water diplomacy and major global drivers of geopolitical change. You’ll examine a range of issues, ranging from topical issues such as water conflicts to long-standing themes like the creation and maintenance of international boundaries and borders at different scales. You’ll also study the factors that drive contemporary territorial disputes, and how the scarcity of natural resources impact this. At the end of this Geopolitics, Resources and Territory MA, you’ll become skilled at geopolitical and political geographic analysis and able to contextualise these issues within the wider social sciences, and the relevant aspects of international law. When you graduate, you will join an alumni network that has gone on to work in the FCTO, in international NGOs involved in dispute resolution, international law firms, and departments of the United Nations and the European Union.

This Geopolitics, Resources and Territory MA will teach you about how internal boundaries on land and sea are created and maintained, focusing on the legal, technical and practical factors.You’ll gain insights into how border and territorial disputes are resolved, and how contemporary issues such as water conflict can be tackled.You’ll also see how academic disciplines have evolved to cover territorial questions and specific analysis such as critical water scholarship, including cutting edge new research and critical lenses. This will give you an appreciation of developing new approaches in critical border studies and critical water scholarshipThis Geopolitics, Resources and Territory MA focuses on how these processes play out at the regional level, with a concentration on the Middle East and North Africa.You’ll develop multidisciplinary lenses, applying geopolitical and political geography analysis, elements of international law, other approaches from the social science and humanities and international relations theory.You’ll also get the chance to specialise in resource geopolitics and associated questions of environmental security, drawing on the politics over water, energy, climate and beyond.

Base campuses

Geopolitics, Resources and Territory (1)

Strand Campus

Located on the north bank of the River Thames, the Strand Campus houses King's College London's arts and sciences faculties.

Geopolitics, Resources and Territory (2)

Waterloo Campus

Waterloo campus is home of the Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing & Midwifery and facilities for other faculties

Regulating bodies

King's is regulated by the Office for Students

Loading...

Teaching methods - what to expect

Lectures

Seminars

Self-Study

Curious to find out more? Access on-demand content including taster lectures and talks, and meet our current staff and students on our subject hub page.

We will use a delivery method that will ensure students have a rich, exciting experience from the start. Face-to-face teaching will be complemented and supported with innovative technology so that students also experience elements of digital learning and assessment.

We will teach you through a combination of lectures and seminars, typically 20 hours per module. We also expect you to undertake 130 hours of independent study for each module.

ModuleLectures, seminars and feedbackSelf-study
Per 15-credit taught module16-30 hours120-134 hours (some modules may involve lab work or e-learning which would require less self-guided learning).
Dissertation moduleUsually 5 contact hours of one-to-one or group consultation with supervisors.

595 hours of self study and project work.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

  • Coursework
  • Practical Examinations
  • Written Examinations
  • Oral Presentations
  • Lab Work
  • Dissertation

Your performance will be assessed through a combination of coursework and written/practical examinations. Forms of assessment may typically include essays and other written assignments, oral presentations, lab work and occasionally by examination, depending on the modules selected. All students also undertake a research-based dissertation of 12,000 words.

Structure

Required modules

Programmes are divided into modules. You will take modules totalling 180-190 credits as outlined below.

You are required to take the following modules:

(Video) A Geopolitical Tour of the World

Optional modules

Please note that for international students, UK Government guidelines are currently more restrictive for those holding part-time visas than full-time visas. If you hold a student visa for a part-time programme, you will not have the right to undertake any work, paid or unpaid, in the UK. Therefore, the Internship (Environment & Society) module is only available to full-time overseas students but not part-time overseas students, as the UK government considers it unpaid work. The Internship module is also available to full- or part-time home students.In addition, you are required to take 60-70 credits from a range of optional modules, which may typically include:

Critical Geographies of Terrorism (15 credits)

Critical Geopolitics (15 credits)

Geopolitics of Natural Resource Disputes (15 credits)

Territorial & Boundary Dispute Resolution (15 credits)

Water Sustainability, Society and Governance (15 credits)

Other Optional Modules Available to Students on this Programme:

  • Any Level 7 (Masters) modules offered in the Department of Geography, including those listed above.
  • Any Level 7 (Masters) modules offered in the Department of War Studies, subject to availability and permission of the module leader.
  • The Law and Practice of the United Nations: Edging Towards Transnational Constitutionalism? (15 credits) (KCL Dickson Poon School of Law, by arrangement)
  • The UN Collective Security System: When Theory Meets Practice (15 credits) (KCL Dickson Poon School of Law, by arrangement)
  • Up to 20 credits of Level 7 (Master’s) modules from any King’s Departments or Institutes outside of Geography, subject to approvals.

Part-Time Students

Part time students are advised to take 75-90 credits of taught modules in their first year, including the compulsory modules Geopolitics of Boundaries, Borderlands and Territory and Security and the Global Natural Environment, thereby allowing enough time to focus on the dissertation in their second year. Students are normally advised to take the compulsory research methods module Practising Social Research in their second year, but that can be taken in the first year, should students have strong reasons to do so and have the agreement of their Programme Director. Research Design and Project Management should be taken in the second year.

King’s College London reviews the modules offered on a regular basis to provide up-to-date, innovative and relevant programmes of study. Therefore, modules offered may change. We suggest you keep an eye on the course finder on our website for updates.

Please note that modules with a practical component will be capped due to educational requirements, which may mean that we cannot guarantee a place to all students who elect to study this module.

(Video) Geopolitics: A Very Short Introduction | Klaus Dodds | Talks at Google

Tuition Fees

UK:

Full time: £11,040 per year (2022/23)

Part time: £5,520 per year (2022/23)

International:

Full time: £24,660 per year (2022/23)

Part time: £12,330 per year (2022/23)

These tuition fees may be subject to additional increases in subsequent years of study, in line with King’s terms and conditions.

Deposit

When you receive an offer for this course you will be required to pay a non-refundable deposit to secure your place. The deposit will be credited towards your total fee payment.

The UK deposit is £500.

The INTERNATIONAL deposit is £2,000.

If you are a current King’s student in receipt of theKing's Living Bursaryyou are not required to pay a deposit to secure your place on the programme. Please note, this will not change the total fees payable for your chosen programme.

Please visit our web pages onfees and fundingfor more information.

Additional Costs

In addition to your tuition costs, you can also expect to pay for:

  • Books if you choose to buy your own copies
  • Clothing for optional course related events and competitions
  • Library fees and fines
  • Personal photocopies
  • Printing course handouts
  • Society membership fees
  • Stationery
  • Graduation costs
  • Travel costs for travel around London and between campuses
  • Some modules include the option to undertake other short day-trip fieldwork. These fieldwork options will enhance the modules, but they are not assessed as part of the module. The additional costs for short day-trip fieldwork would typically not exceed £50 per year.
  • Costs may be incurred for your dissertation work if fieldwork and/or laboratory materials are needed for the chosen study topic, but such work is not mandatory and would not impact academic success if an alternative approach to dissertation research is taken.

Funding

This Geopolitics, Resources and Territory MA will teach you about how internal boundaries on land and sea are created and maintained, focusing on the legal, technical and practical factors.You’ll gain insights into how border and territorial disputes are resolved, and how contemporary issues such as water conflict can be tackled.You’ll also see how academic disciplines have evolved to cover territorial questions and specific analysis such as critical water scholarship, including cutting edge new research and critical lenses. This will give you an appreciation of developing new approaches in critical border studies and critical water scholarshipThis Geopolitics, Resources and Territory MA focuses on how these processes play out at the regional level, with a concentration on the Middle East and North Africa.You’ll develop multidisciplinary lenses, applying geopolitical and political geography analysis, elements of international law, other approaches from the social science and humanities and international relations theory.You’ll also get the chance to specialise in resource geopolitics and associated questions of environmental security, drawing on the politics over water, energy, climate and beyond.

Base campuses

Geopolitics, Resources and Territory (3)

Strand Campus

Located on the north bank of the River Thames, the Strand Campus houses King's College London's arts and sciences faculties.

Geopolitics, Resources and Territory (4)

Waterloo Campus

Waterloo campus is home of the Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing & Midwifery and facilities for other faculties

Regulating bodies

King's is regulated by the Office for Students

(Video) Current situation in Syria | What is U.S benefit in Syria | War of Proxy forces | Geopolitics

Loading...

Teaching methods - what to expect

Lectures

Seminars

Self-Study

Curious to find out more? Access on-demand content including taster lectures and talks, and meet our current staff and students on our subject hub page.

We will use a delivery method that will ensure students have a rich, exciting experience from the start. Face-to-face teaching will be complemented and supported with innovative technology so that students also experience elements of digital learning and assessment.

We will teach you through a combination of lectures and seminars, typically 20 hours per module. We also expect you to undertake 130 hours of independent study for each module.

ModuleLectures, seminars and feedbackSelf-study
Per 15-credit taught module16-30 hours120-134 hours (some modules may involve lab work or e-learning which would require less self-guided learning).
Dissertation moduleUsually 5 contact hours of one-to-one or group consultation with supervisors.

595 hours of self study and project work.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

  • Coursework
  • Practical Examinations
  • Written Examinations
  • Oral Presentations
  • Lab Work
  • Dissertation

Your performance will be assessed through a combination of coursework and written/practical examinations. Forms of assessment may typically include essays and other written assignments, oral presentations, lab work and occasionally by examination, depending on the modules selected. All students also undertake a research-based dissertation of 12,000 words.

Structure

Required modules

Programmes are divided into modules. You will take modules totalling 180-190 credits as outlined below.

You are required to take the following modules:

Dissertation (60 Credits)

Geopolitics of Boundaries, Borderlands and Territory (15 credits)

Practising Social Research (15 credits)

Security and the Global Natural Environment (15 credits)

Optional modules

Please note that for international students, UK Government guidelines are currently more restrictive for those holding part-time visas than full-time visas. If you hold a student visa for a part-time programme, you will not have the right to undertake any work, paid or unpaid, in the UK. Therefore, the Internship (Environment & Society) module is only available to full-time overseas students but not part-time overseas students, as the UK government considers it unpaid work. The Internship module is also available to full- or part-time home students.In addition, you are required to take 60-70 credits from a range of optional modules, which may typically include:

Critical Geographies of Terrorism (15 credits)

(Video) Confronting the Curse: The Economics and Geopolitics of Natural Resource Governance

Critical Geopolitics (15 credits)

Geopolitics of Natural Resource Disputes (15 credits)

Territorial & Boundary Dispute Resolution (15 credits)

Water Sustainability, Society and Governance (15 credits)

Other Optional Modules Available to Students on this Programme:

  • Any Level 7 (Masters) modules offered in the Department of Geography, including those listed above.
  • Any Level 7 (Masters) modules offered in the Department of War Studies, subject to availability and permission of the module leader.
  • The Law and Practice of the United Nations: Edging Towards Transnational Constitutionalism? (15 credits) (KCL Dickson Poon School of Law, by arrangement)
  • The UN Collective Security System: When Theory Meets Practice (15 credits) (KCL Dickson Poon School of Law, by arrangement)
  • Up to 20 credits of Level 7 (Master’s) modules from any King’s Departments or Institutes outside of Geography, subject to approvals.

Part-Time Students

Part time students are advised to take 75-90 credits of taught modules in their first year, including the compulsory modules Geopolitics of Boundaries, Borderlands and Territory and Security and the Global Natural Environment, thereby allowing enough time to focus on the dissertation in their second year. Students are normally advised to take the compulsory research methods module Practising Social Research in their second year, but that can be taken in the first year, should students have strong reasons to do so and have the agreement of their Programme Director. Research Design and Project Management should be taken in the second year.

King’s College London reviews the modules offered on a regular basis to provide up-to-date, innovative and relevant programmes of study. Therefore, modules offered may change. We suggest you keep an eye on the course finder on our website for updates.

Please note that modules with a practical component will be capped due to educational requirements, which may mean that we cannot guarantee a place to all students who elect to study this module.

Tuition Fees

UK:

Full time: £11,040 per year (2022/23)

Part time: £5,520 per year (2022/23)

International:

Full time: £24,660 per year (2022/23)

Part time: £12,330 per year (2022/23)

These tuition fees may be subject to additional increases in subsequent years of study, in line with King’s terms and conditions.

Deposit

When you receive an offer for this course you will be required to pay a non-refundable deposit to secure your place. The deposit will be credited towards your total fee payment.

The UK deposit is £500.

The INTERNATIONAL deposit is £2,000.

  • If you receive an offer on or before 31 March, payment is due by 25 April 2022.

  • If you receive an offer between 1 April and 30 June, payment is due within one month of receiving the offer.

  • If you receive an offer between 1 July and 31 July, payment is due within two weeks of receiving the offer.

  • If you receive an offer between 1 August and 21 August, payment is due within one week of receiving the offer.

  • If you receive an offer from 22 August onwards, payment is due within three days of receiving the offer.

If you are a current King’s student in receipt of theKing's Living Bursaryyou are not required to pay a deposit to secure your place on the programme. Please note, this will not change the total fees payable for your chosen programme.

(Video) POLAND DAILY NEWS- 08.19.22- Russia allocates huge resources to capture more territory in the Donbas

Please visit our web pages onfees and fundingfor more information.

Additional Costs

In addition to your tuition costs, you can also expect to pay for:

  • Books if you choose to buy your own copies
  • Clothing for optional course related events and competitions
  • Library fees and fines
  • Personal photocopies
  • Printing course handouts
  • Society membership fees
  • Stationery
  • Graduation costs
  • Travel costs for travel around London and between campuses
  • Some modules include the option to undertake other short day-trip fieldwork. These fieldwork options will enhance the modules, but they are not assessed as part of the module. The additional costs for short day-trip fieldwork would typically not exceed £50 per year.
  • Costs may be incurred for your dissertation work if fieldwork and/or laboratory materials are needed for the chosen study topic, but such work is not mandatory and would not impact academic success if an alternative approach to dissertation research is taken.

Funding

FAQs

What are the focus of geopolitics? ›

Geopolitics focuses on political power linked to geographic space. In particular, territorial waters and land territory in correlation with diplomatic history.

What is geopolitics in international relations? ›

Geopolitics means exploring different perspectives about the interactive relations between human and physical geographies.

What is geopolitics study? ›

Geopolitics explains how countries, businesses, terrorist groups, etc. try to reach their political goals by controlling geographic features of the world. We call these features geographical entities. Geographical entities are the places, regions, territories, scales, and networks that make up the world.

Who defined geopolitics? ›

The word geopolitics was originally coined by the Swedish political scientist Rudolf Kjellén about the turn of the 20th century, and its use spread throughout Europe in the period between World Wars I and II (1918–39) and came into worldwide use during the latter.

Why do we study geopolitics? ›

Geopolitics provides the link between geography and strategy. Geopolitics is based on the undeniable fact that all international politics, running the gamut from peace to war, takes place in time and space, in particular geographical settings and environments.

What are the three types of geopolitics? ›

In the broader context, geopolitics is regarded as the political type of geo-adaptation of society. From this perspective, it is suggested that the following idealized types of geopolitical models be identified, namely: natural-geographical, socio-geographical, activity-related, and chronogeopolitical.

What are examples of geopolitics? ›

What are some examples of geopolitics? Geopolitical examples may include trade agreements, war treaties, border or territorial acknowledgements, climate agreements, and more. Two recent examples are NAFTA and the Kyoto protocol.

What is geopolitics in simple words? ›

Definition of geopolitics

1 : a study of the influence of such factors as geography, economics, and demography on the politics and especially the foreign policy of a state. 2 : a governmental policy guided by geopolitics.

Which country has best geopolitics? ›

  • United States. #1 in International Influence Rankings. ...
  • China. #2 in International Influence Rankings. ...
  • United Kingdom. #3 in International Influence Rankings. ...
  • France. #4 in International Influence Rankings. ...
  • Germany. #5 in International Influence Rankings. ...
  • Russia. #6 in International Influence Rankings. ...
  • Japan. ...
  • Italy.

What is another word for geopolitics? ›

In this page you can discover 10 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for geopolitics, like: political geography, statecraft, , geo-politics, geography, political-economy, geopolitical, , economic geography and political-science.

What are geopolitical risk factors? ›

Accordingly, we define geopolitical risk as the risk associated with wars, terrorist acts, and tensions between states that affect the normal and peaceful course of international relations.

How many geopolitics are there? ›

The states are grouped into six geopolitical zones, the North Central (NC), North East (NE), North West (NW), South West (SW), South East (SE) and South (SS).

What is geopolitical strategy? ›

“Geopolitical Strategy is not about predicting inherently unpredictable events. It is about getting global policy settings right, improving scenario analysis and probabilities, and thus capitalizing on geopolitical risks and opportunities.” Matt Gertken Chief Strategist, Geopolitical Strategy.

What are geopolitics regions? ›

Regions within geopolitics are social constructs that reflect certain perspectives and judgments in making particular groupings. Flint highlights that there are regional groupings that are determined by physical proximity to each other—i.e., the desert region of Africa or the mountainous region of South America.

What is the difference between geopolitics and geography? ›

Geopolitics examines how geography shapes politics while political geography is about examining how politics shapes geography. Both geopolitics and political geography are closely related.

What is geopolitical significance? ›

Geopolitical significance is an important aspect of relation between states which have common borders. In case of India an d Pakistan, geopolitical deliberations owe their significance to the very act of partition of India into two independent states and Kashmir as a disputed and divided territory between them .

What are geopolitical challenges? ›

Geopolitical risk is about relations between nations – at the political, economic, military, and cultural/ideological level. Risk conventionally occurs when status quos are threatened. Risks are not just a big deal for states, however.

Why is geopolitical risk important? ›

Geopolitical risk — that is, the wide array of risks associated with any sort of conflict or tension between states — has a clear impact on global trade, security, and political relations.

Why are boundaries important in geopolitics? ›

Strong economic, cultural, or political differences are all factors that cause boundaries to become physical dividing lines. Borders are often a priority for national security and sovereignty and are usually guarded by military or other special armed forces.

Is natural resources an example of geopolitics? ›

Natural resources are becoming the new powerful key to defining geopolitics and securing economic and strategic interests. Global power shifts in the post Cold-War era have characteristically moved away from traditional military rivalries to economic expansion and prowess.

What is a territory in geography? ›

Territory is a geographical area subject to the sovereignty, control, or jurisdiction of a state or other entity. 5 - 8.

What are the three theories of territorial power? ›

The Organic theory, Heartland and Rimland theories fall under political geography. Also known as geopolitics. Geopolitics refers to how politics plays a role in geography and influences different geographic attributes such as political borders. All of these theories and disputes are for power and control.

Which country is No 1 in world? ›

United States. The United States of America is a North American nation that is the world's most dominant economic and military power. Likewise, its cultural imprint spans the world, led in large part by its popular culture expressed in music, movies and television.

Who are the 5 superpowers in the world? ›

The world's most powerful countries also are the ones that consistently dominate news headlines, preoccupy policymakers and shape global economic patterns.
...
  • United States. #1 in Power. ...
  • China. #2 in Power. ...
  • Russia. #3 in Power. ...
  • Germany. #4 in Power. ...
  • United Kingdom. #5 in Power. ...
  • South Korea. #6 in Power. ...
  • France. #7 in Power. ...
  • Japan.

What's the difference between international relations and geopolitics? ›

The first understands geopolitics as an approach to or subfield of international politics, while the second considers international relations to be an expression of a particular geopolitics. These differences can be identified by the way geopolitics is used as a synonym for power politics in two senses.

What is geopolitics scale? ›

Geographic scale, referring to the nested hierarchy of bounded spaces of differing size, such as the local, regional, national and global, is a familiar and taken-for-granted concept for political geographers and political analysts.

What is the World Island geopolitics? ›

The World-Island and the Heartland

The World-Island, comprising the interlinked continents of Europe, Asia, and Africa (Afro-Eurasia). This was the largest, most populous, and richest of all possible land combinations.

What are the five main types of political risk? ›

These include taxes, spending, regulation, currency valuation, trade tariffs, labor laws such as the minimum wage, and environmental regulations.

What are the four types of political risks? ›

Types of political risk. There are many kinds of political risks which can affect business: potential political and economic instability, labour problems, local product safety and environmental laws.

What is geopolitical stability? ›

1 functioning as sing the study of the effect of geographical factors on politics, esp. international politics; political geography. 2 functioning as pl the combination of geographical and political factors affecting a country or area.

Who is the father of geopolitics? ›

Sir Halford John Mackinder

What is geopolitical significance? ›

Geopolitical significance is an important aspect of relation between states which have common borders. In case of India an d Pakistan, geopolitical deliberations owe their significance to the very act of partition of India into two independent states and Kashmir as a disputed and divided territory between them .

What is meant by the term geopolitics? ›

Britannica Dictionary definition of GEOPOLITICS. 1. [noncount] : the study of how geography and economics have an influence on politics and on the relations between nations. 2. [plural] : the political and geographic parts of something.

How many geopolitics are there? ›

The states are grouped into six geopolitical zones, the North Central (NC), North East (NE), North West (NW), South West (SW), South East (SE) and South (SS).

What is a geopolitical strategy? ›

September 2016) Geostrategy, a subfield of geopolitics, is a type of foreign policy guided principally by geographical factors as they inform, constrain, or affect political and military planning.

What is another word for geopolitics? ›

In this page you can discover 10 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for geopolitics, like: political geography, statecraft, , geo-politics, geography, political-economy, geopolitical, , economic geography and political-science.

What are the issues of geopolitics? ›

Geopolitical tensions are exactly what they sound like — political issues between or involving 2 or more countries that cause tension or unrest. These tensions can stem from several factors, but some examples are power, trade, military activity, climate change or a significant event like Brexit.

What are geopolitical influences? ›

Geopolitical determinants affect social determinants of health. Social determinants include poverty, unemployment, urbanization, industrialization, and lack of green spaces in urban areas and all of these are influenced by geopolitical determinants.

Which country has best geopolitics? ›

  • United States. #1 in International Influence Rankings. ...
  • China. #2 in International Influence Rankings. ...
  • United Kingdom. #3 in International Influence Rankings. ...
  • France. #4 in International Influence Rankings. ...
  • Germany. #5 in International Influence Rankings. ...
  • Russia. #6 in International Influence Rankings. ...
  • Japan. ...
  • Italy.

What are geopolitical risk factors? ›

Accordingly, we define geopolitical risk as the risk associated with wars, terrorist acts, and tensions between states that affect the normal and peaceful course of international relations.

What are boundaries in geopolitics? ›

Geopolitics have a lot of influence on how a country deals with its boundaries. A boundary is a physical or imaginary barrier that separates two things. National boundaries refer to different borders that outline the territory of a country.

Is natural resources an example of geopolitics? ›

Natural resources are becoming the new powerful key to defining geopolitics and securing economic and strategic interests. Global power shifts in the post Cold-War era have characteristically moved away from traditional military rivalries to economic expansion and prowess.

What is the difference between geography and geopolitics? ›

Geopolitics is the study of the Earth's geography on politics and international relations. Basing foreign and domestic policies on your home countries geography.

Videos

1. How Portugal Is Using China to Get The USA
(Culturiosity)
2. Arctic War: The Growing Tensions over Arctic Resources - TLDR News
(TLDR News Global)
3. Antarctic Territories Explained: Geopolitics in Antarctica
(Ticket To Know)
4. RESOURCE GEOPOLITICS
(Doubtnut)
5. The Art of Geopolitics, Part 1: Introduction
(CaspianReport)
6. Prof. Klaus Dodds on Arctic Geopolitics
(Seçkin Barış Gülmez)

Top Articles

Latest Posts

Article information

Author: Arielle Torp

Last Updated: 12/16/2022

Views: 6546

Rating: 4 / 5 (61 voted)

Reviews: 84% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Arielle Torp

Birthday: 1997-09-20

Address: 87313 Erdman Vista, North Dustinborough, WA 37563

Phone: +97216742823598

Job: Central Technology Officer

Hobby: Taekwondo, Macrame, Foreign language learning, Kite flying, Cooking, Skiing, Computer programming

Introduction: My name is Arielle Torp, I am a comfortable, kind, zealous, lovely, jolly, colorful, adventurous person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.