This month’s best paperbacks: Sally Rooney, Stephen King and more (2022)

Tue 21 Jun 2022 11.25 BST

This month’s best paperbacks: Sally Rooney, Stephen King and more (1)

History

The making of a billion dollar industry

The Story of Yoga

Alistair Shearer

The Story of Yoga Alistair Shearer

The making of a billion dollar industry

This month’s best paperbacks: Sally Rooney, Stephen King and more (2) This month’s best paperbacks: Sally Rooney, Stephen King and more (3)

Yoga is now a $25 billion-a-year wellness industry. In America alone its popularity has exploded in the last two decades. At the end of the 20th century there were fewer than 100,000 people engaging in yoga, but by 2016 there were more than 37 million. In the UK, around 3 million practice some form of yoga, mostly women.

Shearer, a former lecturer at SOAS University of London and a historian specialising in Indian art, proves himself to be an expert and entertaining guide to the history of yoga. This rich and detailed celebration of yoga in Indian and Western culture, begins with its origins among the subcontinent’s wandering holy men (“sadhus”), before tracing what happened when this ancient tradition of teachings was “uprooted and transplanted into modern soil” in the West.

He begins by rejecting the idea that yoga is five thousand years old (“an old romantic longing”). The Vedas, the scriptures at the heart of Hinduism dating back to 2500 BC, don’t refer to yoga as a postural or physical act. Instead, yoga – which means “union with the Divine” – was a spiritual practice in which the inner body “acts as the conduit for the cosmic life-force”. As the Maitri Upanishad says: “by the practice of yoga one achieves contentment, endurance of the pairs of opposites, and peacefulness”.

Yoga was less about athletic flexibility and wellbeing than it was about creating an effortless state of mental absorption: “the settling of the thought-waves in the mind”, as Maharishi Patanjali said in the Yoga Sutra from before AD 350, described by Shearer as “a little masterpiece”. Body-yoga, as Shearer describes modern postural yoga, does not begin to be taught until about the ninth century AD.

Today, according to Shearer, yoga means “just about whatever you want it to”. From hot yoga (both George Clooney and Lady Gaga were fans in the 1990s), and “orgasmic meditation” seeking to cure the “female pleasure-deficit disorder”, to “Yogilates”, yoga has certainly come a long way from the caves and forests of ancient India.

Shearer finds it deeply ironic though that today’s quest for a “fit, toned and attractive physique” is the opposite of what yoga was originally about. The ancient sages all agreed that the cause of human suffering was the identification with the body. As the Bengali sage Anandamayi Ma said, unless yoga “aims at the Eternal, it is nothing more than gymnastics.”

PD Smith

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(Video) ☁️ i read + ranked sally rooney's novels to see if they're worth the hype

Graphic novel

A golden age of super heroes

Penguin Classics Marvel Collection

Ben Saunders (series editor)

Penguin Classics Marvel Collection Ben Saunders (series editor)

A golden age of super heroes

This month’s best paperbacks: Sally Rooney, Stephen King and more (5) This month’s best paperbacks: Sally Rooney, Stephen King and more (6)

The Golden Age of comic-book super heroes began with Superman in 1938, closely followed by Bat-Man the year after. In 1941, before America had even entered the Second World War, two Jewish Americans, Joe Simon and Jack Kirby, decided that a new “long underwear hero” (as costume heroes were known in the comic book industry) was needed to sort out Adolf Hitler.

The Nazi leader was a ridiculous figure with a “comical moustache”, according to Simon, and it was his super hero, Captain America, who punched him in the face on the cover of Captain America Comics #1.

As graphic novelist Gene Luen Yang writes in the Foreword to this collection of classic Captain America stories, it’s an image that is still powerful. The writer, artist and Cap himself were all children of immigrants. Yang is too, and that fact alone meant the world to him: “an immigrant’s kid punched Hitler in the mouth while cosplaying the American flag”. What could be cooler?

Ben Saunders, editor of the new Penguin Classics Marvel Collection, notes that Captain America Comics #1 was “a tremendously effective piece of popular propaganda” and “a smash hit”. It was published by Martin Goodman’s Timely Comics, which would become Marvel in the 1960s.

After the war, the moral simplicity of the superhero began to seem naïve and costumed crime-fighters declined in popularity. But in the early 1960s, a new golden age of superheroes began, led by Marvel’s artists and writers, in what Saunders describes as “an astounding burst of creativity”.

Writer-editor Stan Lee and artist Jack Kirby (“one of the most significant comic book creators of the past century”) were the creative geniuses behind characters such as the Incredible Hulk, the Black Panther, Iron Man, and the X-Men. They brought them together in The Avengers and also revived Captain America for a new generation of fans. With artist Steve Ditko, Lee co-created Spider-Man too.

In this new series from Penguin Classics, three volumes of Marvel stories are published this month, with more to follow. These handsome editions, published in hardback and paperback, are packed with some 350pp of glorious, full-colour super-hero nostalgia, as well as forewords by contemporary authors and scholarly introductions. A wonderful celebration of American post-war popular culture that will be essential reading for fans of the super-hero genre and the Marvel Universe.

PD Smith

£21.75 each (RRP £25) - Purchase at the Guardian bookshop

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Memoir

Amid the collapse of communism

Free

Lea Ypi

Free Lea Ypi

Amid the collapse of communism

This month’s best paperbacks: Sally Rooney, Stephen King and more (8) This month’s best paperbacks: Sally Rooney, Stephen King and more (9)

One wet afternoon in December 1990, little Lea Ypi ran across Tirana to the garden of the Palace of Culture. Making sure no one could see her, she pressed her warm cheek to the cold thigh of a statue and tried to make her arms encircle its knees. And then she looked up to savour the figure’s friendly moustache, only to suppress a scream. Hooligan demonstrators calling for freedom and democracy had decapitated one of her favourite uncles.

Ypi at the time had two favourite uncles, both communists, both dead, neither actual relations. Albania’s leader Enver Hoxha was one, Joseph Stalin the other, and her superbly unreliable teacher, Nora, had taught her student to venerate both. After all, was it not Marx’s teacher Hangel (not Hegel, Nora clarified), who had described Napoleon as the spirit of history on a horse? Stalin, Nora told Lea, was the spirit of history on a tank. Plus he had a great moustache.

Like a Balkan Jojo Rabbit, Ypi was as a result in thrall to an evil dictator, and her memoir is, in part, the story of how she disabused herself, left Albania as it collapsed during the late 1990s into gangsterdom, finally becoming professor of political theory at the London School of Economics. But this is no triumphalist narrative of liberation from state oppression. Nor is this one of those eastern European memoirs dripping with ostalgie for a time before the consumer society. Ypi’s memoir is instead brilliantly observed, politically nuanced and – best of all – funny.

(Video) Books for Sally Rooney Fans | Reading Recommendations

Stuart Jeffries

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Fiction

The problem of success

Beautiful World, Where Are You?

Sally Rooney

Beautiful World, Where Are You? Sally Rooney

The problem of success

This month’s best paperbacks: Sally Rooney, Stephen King and more (11) This month’s best paperbacks: Sally Rooney, Stephen King and more (12)

“Aren’t we unfortunate babies to be born when the world ended?” In Rooney’s third novel, Beautiful World, Where Are You, Alice and Eileen are best friends, about to turn 30, who are agreed that human civilisation is facing collapse, beauty is dead, art is commodified and the novel irrelevant as a form. These smart Irish Marxists are best friends from college, and they have lives that are, in very different ways, a bit like Rooney’s own. Alice is an unfeasibly successful young writer and Eileen works for a literary magazine, earning 20 grand a year. The book interleaves their separate love stories with the long emails they send each other, in which they have much to discuss and share.

“We are standing in the last lighted room before the darkness,” says Alice, given that “there is no chance for the planet, and no chance for us.” And though Eileen agrees, she finds solace in the ordinary. “Maybe we are just born to love and worry about the people we know,” she replies. “In fact it’s the very reason I root for us to survive – because we are so stupid about each other.” Alice will be stupid about Felix, a possibly dodgy guy she meets on Tinder, and Eileen will be incredibly stupid about Simon, the friend of her youth, who is gorgeous, unapproachably moral and, of all things, a Catholic.

How do you follow two brilliantly acclaimed novels? Rooney has solved the problem of success by writing about the problem of success. It is never clear how we are to relate to Alice, the writer, who feels separated from her origins by “a gulf of sophistication”. She can be chilly and intimidating, while her indifference to her finances can only be a provocation to the people who love her, and who haven’t got tuppence to their name.

The exposure of fame, especially sudden fame like Rooney’s, is deeply shocking. Like any trauma, it empties our lives of meaning, at least for a while. Afterwards, there is always the hope that a writer can return to the difficulty and pleasure of the work – that the world has not robbed them of the very thing we celebrate them for. It is wonderful to see such a return happen in front of you on the page. Alice’s conclusions are essentially religious. For the reader, caring for a fictional character is a way of practising the kind of “disinterested love to which Jesus calls us”. For the writer, a novel is a blessing that can not be refused. We must all be delighted that she, and her creator, have found a way through.

Anne Enright

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Crime fiction

(Video) Sally Rooney on 'Conversations with Friends' | Writer Sally Rooney | Louisiana Channel

Jack Laidlaw's origin story

The Dark Remains

William McIlvanney and Ian Rankin

The Dark Remains William McIlvanney and Ian Rankin

Jack Laidlaw's origin story

This month’s best paperbacks: Sally Rooney, Stephen King and more (14) This month’s best paperbacks: Sally Rooney, Stephen King and more (15)

Using notes left by the founding father of “tartan noir” William McIlvanney (1936-2015), bestselling Scottish novelist Ian Rankin has completed a prequel to the author’s magnificent trilogy featuring police officer Jack Laidlaw. Set in Glasgow in 1972, The Dark Remains is not so much an origin story – the bookish, thoughtful and often acerbic loner, blueprint for Inspector Rebus and many others, seems fully formed and entirely recognisable – as a homage. When lawyer Bobby Carter, right-hand man to gang boss Cam Colvin, is stabbed to death, the police are concerned that this may be the opening salvo in a turf war between the city’s criminal factions. Although a lowly DC, Laidlaw ignores the orders of his blundering superior and strikes out with his own investigation. Ever-changing loyalties and betrayals abound – not least Laidlaw’s selfish neglect of his wife and children – and although the denouement may be predictable, and Rankin’s prose might not quite match McIlvanney’s inimitable style, The Dark Remains is an immersive and satisfyingly pitch-black read.

Laura Wilson

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Fiction

Bleak and impressive

The Women of Troy

Pat Barker

The Women of Troy Pat Barker

Bleak and impressive

This month’s best paperbacks: Sally Rooney, Stephen King and more (17) This month’s best paperbacks: Sally Rooney, Stephen King and more (18)

Published in 2018, Pat Barker’s The Silence of the Girls was a rewriting of the plot of the Iliad from the point of view of a captive queen, Briseis, over whose possession Agamemnon and Achilles fell out. It wasn’t an easy task Barker had set herself. Achilles – terrifying, charismatic and doomed to an early death – is hard to sideline. Through Briseis’s clear eyes the Greek base, peopled by fighting men and captive women, was revealed to be a “rape camp”. But, as Briseis herself remarks, “A song isn’t new merely because a woman’s voice is singing it.” The story remained, stubbornly, one mainly about men. In this sequel, though, Barker has stepped free of the masculinist epic tradition. Briseis is still the narrator, but Barker has left the Iliad behind, with its insistence on the glory and the pathos of warfare. The Women of Troy draws mainly on a very different source – Euripides’ tragedy The Trojan Women. This is a story not of conflict but of its aftermath.

Clearly and simply told, with no obscurities of vocabulary or allusion, this novel reads sometimes like a retelling for children of the legend of Troy, but its conclusions are for adults – merciless, stripped of consoling beauty, impressively bleak.

Lucy Hughes-Hallett

£7.64 (RRP £8.99) - Purchase at the Guardian bookshop

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Fiction

The collective trauma of a continent

Snow Country

Sebastian Faulks

(Video) Writer Sally Rooney on Transforming Life Into Novels | Louisiana Channel

Snow Country Sebastian Faulks

The collective trauma of a continent

This month’s best paperbacks: Sally Rooney, Stephen King and more (20) This month’s best paperbacks: Sally Rooney, Stephen King and more (21)

Sebastian Faulks’s 2005 novel, Human Traces, made explicit his ongoing fascination with the mystery of human consciousness and the forces – historical, political and biological – that converge to shape an individual life. Its two central characters, Thomas Midwinter and Jacques Rebière, are psychiatrists with opposing views on maladies of the mind who pool their expertise to found a state-of-the-art sanatorium in the Austrian mountains at the end of the 19th century.

Sixteen years on, Faulks has returned to the terrain of Human Traces, geographically and thematically, with his new novel, Snow Country, the second in a planned Austrian trilogy that spans the first half of the 20th century and the reshaping of Europe through war. This will be familiar territory to fans of Faulks’s hugely successful Birdsong trilogy, but with Snow Country – despite a highly charged opening scene in a field hospital – his focus is less on the frontline drama of warfare than the prelude and aftermath of conflict, and the narrative moves between corresponding states of foreboding and reflection, rarely looking directly at the great war itself.

Through the gradual convergence of his characters’ lives, Faulks powerfully evokes the mood of a continent that still has not processed its collective trauma, even as the threat of another looms. “This is not the great age of belief any more,” one character says. “We’re a third of the way through the new century. But the great advance in medicine and science has stopped. Instead, we’re trying to understand the death of 10 million men.”

In Snow Country, Faulks has created a richly melancholic novel of ideas that celebrates the pity, the comedy and the beauty of our brief lives.

Stephanie Merritt

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This month’s best paperbacks: Sally Rooney, Stephen King and more (22)

Fiction

His best book in years

Billy Summers

Stephen King

Billy Summers Stephen King

His best book in years

This month’s best paperbacks: Sally Rooney, Stephen King and more (23) This month’s best paperbacks: Sally Rooney, Stephen King and more (24)

No matter what he writes, Stephen King will always be considered a horror novelist. It’s unavoidable now; he is responsible for too many of the fantastical nightmares that prowl popular culture. Yet in his latest novel, Billy Summers, there are no supernatural shades whatsoever (save a late Easter egg reference to a certain haunted hotel). Instead, he is in full noir mode, with a modest tale of an assassin on the requisite one-last-job-before-he’s-out. It meanders, it pays only the scantest regard to the rules of narrative structure, it indulges gladly in both casual stereotyping and naked political point-scoring. And it’s his best book in years.

The set-up is straightforward. Billy is an ex-army sniper turned killer-for-hire who, conveniently for the purposes of readerly sympathy, only kills “bad men”. Tasked with a hit on a small-time crook, he relocates to a provincial city in an unspecified southern state where, due to the machinations of plot, he must live a double life in the local community while waiting for his shot. Like all good King protagonists, he fills his time with writing his life story. It’s a tale of violent youth and wartime tragedy that begins as an unwelcome interruption to the main proceedings but gradually accrues more weight as a window on to Billy’s off-kilter moral code.

For 200 pages, Billy Summers feels like a retread of King’s alternative-history doorstop 11/22/63, told this time from the assassin’s perspective. But at the midpoint, this novel takes an entirely unexpected turn, introducing a character who will alter the course of Billy’s life and the nature of the novel. From here on the focus narrows, the pace quickens and the ethics become murkier. This strikes an odd balance with the sunlit, languorous first half. It shouldn’t work, but it does, largely because King is so good at character and making us care through incidental details.

In interviews, King often references the American naturalism of Theodore Dreiser and Frank Norris, and the hardboiled crime fiction of Ross MacDonald and Donald E Westlake. Billy Summers combines these two strands into the author’s own brand of muscular, heightened realism. He may always be considered a horror novelist, but King is doing the best work of his later career when the ghosts are packed away and the monsters are all too human.

Neil McRobert

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FAQs

What order should I read Sally Rooney books? ›

  • i. Mr Salary. Sally Rooney. 2016.
  • i. Conversations with Friends. A Novel. Sally Rooney. 2017.
  • i. Normal People. A Novel. Sally Rooney. 2018.
  • i. Beautiful World, Where Are You. A Novel. Sally Rooney. 2021.

How many books Sally Rooney sold? ›

According to a Faber publicist, in an email to Review, Rooney's books have sold some three million copies in all formats.

Does Stephen King have kids? ›

Stephen King

Is Sally Rooney Marxist? ›

Who is Sally Rooney and what are her books about? Rooney was born in 1991 in Castlebar in the West of Ireland and describes herself as Marxist. Her mother ran a cultural center and her father worked for Telecom until it was privatized. Rooney studied English at Trinity College.

What should I read first Normal People or Conversations with Friends? ›

Rooney's debut novel Conversations with Friends, which begat the Hulu series which prompts this investigation, came out in 2017. Rooney followed that up in 2018 with Normal People, which charted the lengthy relationship of Marianne and Connell, who are divided by class and social status.

Is Conversations With Friends as good as Normal People? ›

By midway through the 12-part series, Conversations With Friends turns into every bit the equal, if not even the better screen experience than Normal People. It luxuriates in Rooney's hard wisdom, her sterling authorial control at not judging what her characters do, just explaining in forensic detail why they do it.

Do Nick and Frances end up together? ›

As for Frances, we see her getting diagnosed with endometriosis which also happens to be the same day Nick comes clean about his progressing relationship with Melissa while he is still seeing Frances. Heartbroken with two extremely upset news in her life, she ends things with Nick.

Do Bobbi and Frances end up together? ›

So much of this drama plays out in the final episode, with Frances and Bobbi getting back together and then the potential whiplash of that final scene.

What is Stephen King's number one book? ›

It should hardly be a surprise that Stephen King's most popular book is also his first-ever bestseller: "The Shining," a classic 1977 horror novel, spurred a cult-favorite movie and a sequel.

What is Stephen King's best-selling book? ›

The Shining is Stephen King's top selling book and it is also his top rated book on Goodreads. Therefore, it is a strong contender for the Stephen King book you should read first. The Shining was first published in 1977, with its sequel, Dr Sleep, published in 2013.

What is Stephen King's best book? ›

Stephen King

What's the most read book of 2022? ›

  • It Ends with Us: A Novel (1) 179,602. ...
  • Where the Crawdads Sing. 355,268. ...
  • Verity. 174,887. ...
  • Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones. 85,899. ...
  • It Starts with Us: A Novel (It Ends with Us) 8,716. ...
  • Reminders of Him: A Novel. 158,044. ...
  • Ugly Love: A Novel. 87,047. ...
  • The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo: A Novel.

What book is trending now? ›

Trending Books
  • Death Leaves a Shadow (Marlowe Black Mystery, #2) ...
  • Paradox Effect: Time Travel and Purified DNA Merge to Halt the Collapse of Human Existence (Paperback) ...
  • Immoral Origins (The Desire Card, #1) ...
  • Problems at the Pub (Sugar Mountain, #4) ...
  • Where the Crawdads Sing (ebook) ...
  • Unparalleled (Kindle Edition)

What should I read in 2022 non fiction? ›

The Best Nonfiction Books of 2022 (So Far)
  • Year of the Tiger, by Alice Wong. ...
  • Fen, Bog & Swamp, by Annie Proulx. ...
  • Butts, by Heather Radke. ...
  • Novelist as a Vocation, by Haruki Murakami. ...
  • How You Get Famous: Ten Years of Drag Madness in Brooklyn, by Nicole Pasulka.
28 Sept 2022

What is the book most read? ›

The Holy Bible is the most read book in the world. In the past 50 years, the Bible has sold over 3.9 billion copies.

What age is Normal People book appropriate for? ›

There was plenty of nude and strong mature themes. My older son said: "If they are making shows like these... well they are wasting their times making it." I agree with him. I swore there was a brief mention of p***n***rap*ic. I suggest 16+ to watch.

What should I read if I like my year of rest and relaxation? ›

My Year of Rest and Relaxation Read-Alikes
  • Care of Wooden Floors. by Will Wiles. ...
  • Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs. by Johann Hari. ...
  • Eileen. by Ottessa Moshfegh. ...
  • Girls. by Lena Dunham. ...
  • Harold and Maude. by Hal Ashby. ...
  • Look at Me. by Jennifer Egan. ...
  • The Safe House. by Christophe Boltanski. ...
  • Self-Help.

What should I read after Sally Rooney? ›

Books to Read If You Love Sally Rooney
  • Beautiful World, Where Are You: Sunday Times number one... ...
  • Ordinary People: Shortlisted for the Women's Prize for... ...
  • Americanah. ...
  • The Interestings. ...
  • All the Light We Cannot See. ...
  • One Day: Soon to be a Netflix TV series. ...
  • Fates and Furies: New York Times bestseller. ...
  • The Virgin Suicides.

What is a novelist salary? ›

Writers and authors develop written content. Quick Facts: Writers and Authors. 2021 Median Pay. $69,510 per year.

What is Sally Rooney's writing style? ›

She expends no apparent effort to be luminous or “literary.” She doesn't go to great lengths to flaunt her erudition or intelligence. In fact, for long stretches of her first novel, Rooney's prose seems to aim for a flat, muted affect, avoiding flights of lyricism or theatricalized emotion like the plague.

What is Marxism theory? ›

Marxism is a social, political, and economic theory originated by Karl Marx that focuses on the struggle between capitalists and the working class. Marx wrote that the power relationships between capitalists and workers were inherently exploitative and would inevitably create class conflict.

What do you read after a conversation with friends? ›

16 Books To Fill The Sally Rooney-Sized Hole In Your Heart Once You've Binged Hulu's "Conversations With Friends"
  • Happy Hour by Marlowe Granados. ...
  • Luster by Raven Leilani. ...
  • Exciting Times by Naoise Dolan. ...
  • Play It as It Lays by Joan Didion. ...
  • Topics of Conversation by Miranda Popkey. ...
  • Open Water by Caleb Azumah Nelson.
22 May 2022

What do Normal People talk about? ›

Most people enjoy talking about their hobbies, themselves, their thoughts, or their experiences. While most people like to talk about things that are going on in their lives, this is usually a topic reserved for close friends. Someone you have just met might feel uncomfortable if you ask them personal information.

Are Normal People over? ›

Neither Hulu nor any of the show's creators have announced plans for a second season—and there's also the issue that the novel's plot was mostly used up by season one. Connell (Paul Mescal) and Marianne (Daisy Edgar-Jones) in Normal People.

Is Frances a communist Conversations With Friends? ›

Frances, no longer a committed communist

In the novel, none of these dynamics go unexamined. Instead they play out through fascinating conversations between the characters. In the show, Frances renounces her communist beliefs in the first episode.

Are Frances and Bobbi in Normal People? ›

Alison Oliver will play Frances; Sasha Lane will play Bobbi; Joe Alwyn will play Nick; and Jemima Kirke will play Melissa.

What perspective is Normal People written in? ›

Normal People is narrated in close third person, alternating between Connell's and Marianne's perspective. This delightfully claustrophobic structure creates the sense that the novel's central character is neither individual, but the interdependent (or perhaps codependent) couple ...

Does Frances love Bobbi or Nick? ›

Thankfully, though it takes a while, Frances eventually realizes how much she loves Bobbi in the present tense, telling Nick during the final phone call of the series that she loved Bobbi the whole time.

Who did Frances end up with? ›

Frances tells him she and Bobbi are back together and in love… and admits she didn't tell him about her endometriosis diagnosis.

Is conversation with friends LGBT? ›

Conversations with Friends is a quietly queer story; it's a novel about sexuality, womanhood, desire, but the novel does not depend on discourse. It feels no obligation to explain things by way of naming them. In fact, Frances' sexuality is mentioned only once.

Is Nick in love with Frances? ›

He later confesses to having fallen in love with Frances as their bond becomes inseparable. By the end of the series, Nick finds some reconnection with his wife, and as such it marks the beginning of the end of things with Frances.

Will there be a season 2 of conversation with friends? ›

The second season of Conversations with Friends will follow the Hulu's script than the novel written by Sally Rooney. "All our lives are unfinished stories until we shuffle off ultimately," executive producer Ed Guiney said.

What does the ending mean in Conversations with Friends? ›

She finally reveals she left him due to her endometriosis diagnosis and possible infertility. While the conversation does initially feel as though it has a sense of closure to it, like France finally told the truth and now they can both move on, then Nick tells her he still has feelings for her.

Which is the No 1 book in the world? ›

Top 100 best selling books of all time
RankTitleAuthor
1Da Vinci Code,TheBrown, Dan
2Harry Potter and the Deathly HallowsRowling, J.K.
3Harry Potter and the Philosopher's StoneRowling, J.K.
4Harry Potter and the Order of the PhoenixRowling, J.K.
45 more rows

What is the most popular reading book? ›

Having sold more than 500 million copies worldwide, Harry Potter by J. K. Rowling is the best-selling book series in history.

What is the top selling book? ›

The Bible. The Bible is the best-selling book of all time, having sold around 5 billion copies to date. The book had several authors and can be roughly divided into two parts: The Old Testament and the New Testament.

What is Colleen Hoover's best-selling book? ›

It Ends With Us

It Ends With Us is the absolute best of Colleen Hoover books, achieving #1 New York Times bestseller status even YEARS after its publication and over ONE BILLION tags on TikTok. Likewise, over a million readers have reviewed it on GoodReads.

What is Stephen King's best-selling book? ›

The Shining is Stephen King's top selling book and it is also his top rated book on Goodreads. Therefore, it is a strong contender for the Stephen King book you should read first. The Shining was first published in 1977, with its sequel, Dr Sleep, published in 2013.

What is one book everyone should read? ›

"Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen. "The Diary of Anne Frank" by Anne Frank. "1984" by George Orwell. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" by J.K. Rowling.

What book is trending now? ›

Trending Books
  • Death Leaves a Shadow (Marlowe Black Mystery, #2) ...
  • Paradox Effect: Time Travel and Purified DNA Merge to Halt the Collapse of Human Existence (Paperback) ...
  • Immoral Origins (The Desire Card, #1) ...
  • Problems at the Pub (Sugar Mountain, #4) ...
  • Where the Crawdads Sing (ebook) ...
  • Unparalleled (Kindle Edition)

Who is the greatest novelist of all time? ›

Top 10 Best Novelists of All Time
  • #1 MARY ANNE EVANS.
  • #2 JANE AUSTEN.
  • #3 CHARLES DICKENS.
  • #4 J.D. SALINGER.
  • #5 MARK TWAIN.
  • #6 ERNEST HEMINGWAY.
  • #7 GEORGE ORWELL.
  • #8 VIRGINIA WOOLF.
20 Mar 2021

Who is the best-selling author 2022? ›

Top 10 Selling Books, 2022 Year-to-Date
RankTitleAuthor
1It Ends With UsColleen Hoover
2Where the Crawdads SingDelia Owens
3VerityColleen Hoover
4Ugly LoveColleen Hoover
6 more rows

What is an Amazon #1 best seller? ›

The Amazon #1 Best Seller badge icon means a product has the highest number of sales in that specific category. Amazon's A9 algorithm determines how products are ranked in search results. Amazon's algorithm updates best seller status hourly.

What is Colleen Hoover's number one book? ›

'Reminders of Him'

A poignant yet heartwarming love story of a mother yearning for her daughter, Reminders Of Him, is unequivocally the best book by Colleen Hoover and boasts a Goodreads rating of 4.52.

What is Colleen Hoover's most romantic book? ›

1. "It Ends with Us" "It Ends with Us" is a gripping romance and the most popular Colleen Hoover book among Goodreads reviewers. Lily has worked hard for all her successes, so when she meets handsome, stubborn neurosurgeon Ryle Kincaid, it seems like all of the pieces of her life are finally coming together.

What author is similar to Colleen Hoover? ›

Authors Like Colleen Hoover
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Author: Dong Thiel

Last Updated: 10/03/2022

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Name: Dong Thiel

Birthday: 2001-07-14

Address: 2865 Kasha Unions, West Corrinne, AK 05708-1071

Phone: +3512198379449

Job: Design Planner

Hobby: Graffiti, Foreign language learning, Gambling, Metalworking, Rowing, Sculling, Sewing

Introduction: My name is Dong Thiel, I am a brainy, happy, tasty, lively, splendid, talented, cooperative person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.